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TRILUX’s Innovative Light as a Service Financing Model Creates New Opportunities for electronic control systems specialist

Wiesheu Elektronik, a specialist in the development and manufacturing of electronic control systems for industrial applications, has recently undergone a lighting transformation of their 2,000 m2 head office in Burgstetten, Germany, thanks to TRILUX’s innovative Light as a Service rental model.

The project, which aimed to convert the lighting of the storage and production areas and its new office building, was completed with minimal effort and investment by Wiesheu Elektronik.

Wiesheu Elektronik took advantage of TRILUX’s Light as a Service rental model. This innovative financing option allows clients to enjoy modern, energy-efficient lighting systems without the burden of high investment costs. This model involves TRILUX planning, installing, and operating the lighting system, including all service and maintenance tasks. The client, in this case, Wiesheu Elektronik, rents the new lighting for seven years for an agreed monthly fee.

“We can enjoy a state-of-the-art, smart lighting system without any investment or risks since we are only dealing with fixed, calculable monthly costs,” explains Arndt Wiesheu, Managing Director of Wiesheu Elektronik GmbH.

TRILUX’s comprehensive portfolio and a highly competent and committed project team enabled the company to provide Wiesheu Elektronik with a tailor-made, high-quality, and energy-efficient lighting solution. The E-LINE NEXT LED continuous line was installed in the storage and production areas, while the FINEA LED light channel, Luceo Slim free-standing luminaires, and ONPLANA LED and SOLEGRA LED pendants were installed in the offices. All the luminaires are networked and controlled via the LIVE LINK PREMIUM light management system. In addition, daylight and presence detection sensors have been integrated to minimise energy consumption further.

“Our Light as a Service rental model offers seven years of carefree and balance sheet neutral lighting, allowing our clients to enjoy the benefits of a modern lighting system without the burden of high investment costs,” explains Tim Riedel, Project Manager TRILUX sales.

TRILUX is proud to have partnered with Wiesheu Elektronik on this project. It is confident that the Light as a Service rental model will continue to create new opportunities for other companies looking to upgrade their lighting systems.


For more information on TRILUX Industry Solutions, please CLICK HERE

 


 

TRILUX, a leading lighting solutions provider, is proud to announce its successful collaboration with Kromwijk Elektrotechniek to provide a WELL and BREEAM certified lighting and management scheme for the newest distribution centre of fashion brand Scotch & Soda in Hoofddorp, Netherlands.

The new distribution centre has 16 loading docks, a large office, and a car park for 100 cars under the building. In line with the BREEAM and WELL guidelines, TRILUX provided all the lighting solutions for the distribution hall, the offices, the parking garage, and the building surrounds.

To ensure high sustainability and achieve WELL and BREEAM certification, the lighting scheme exceeded the standard requirements for workplace lighting. TRILUX’s experts and project leaders supported the installer in creating a lighting design to meet the end client’s wishes and needs.

Raymond van Dijken, the Sales Manager at TRILUX Benelux, highlighted the importance of the close partnership with Kromwijk Elektrotechniek. “From the start, we have worked with Kromwijk to jointly get a clear picture of the end customer’s wishes. With this information, we went to the drawing board and completely worked out the lighting concept. We have installed our highly efficient light line system E-LINE NEXT in the hall, the robust waterproof solution ARAGON FIT in the parking garage, the JOVIE in the outdoor areas and various functional and design luminaires in the offices and circulation areas.”

The TRILUX LIVELINK Premium light management system, links all the luminaires in an intelligent system to ensure maximum energy savings and to maintain flexibility during operation. For example, the lighting specialist has exceeded the requirements with higher-performing luminaires that deliver more lux to the work surface than necessary. Raymond said,

“we have dimmed these luminaires using LiveLink to extend their lifespan.”

He continues, “We are pleased to have successfully completed this project and shown great cooperation between the installer and end customer. Despite the turbulent market, everything was delivered on time, and the installer and end-user are very satisfied with the new building.”


For more information on the project, CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE VIDEO

 


TRILUX is committed to providing high-quality lighting solutions that meet the needs of its customers while ensuring maximum energy savings and flexibility. With this successful project with Scotch & Soda, TRILUX reinforces its reputation as a leading provider of lighting solutions in the industry.

 

The former press and broadcast centre in London’s Olympic Park has been transformed into the one of the biggest tech hubs in Europe, with Brett Martin Daylight Systems’ Marlon Clickfix RL glazing system glazed with Marlon Clickfix 1040 polycarbonate, providing a low pitch rooflight which maximises natural light and creates a bright, appealing and naturally-lit environment for a range of businesses.

From a design by Hawkins Brown, Here East is a major new 1.2 million sq ft development in Stratford that is set to transform creative and digital industries in London. Comprising three buildings – the former press and broadcast centres, and a 750-seat auditorium – the challenge for the main contractor was converting what were once windowless and cavernous warehouses into eye-catching, daylight-filled buildings with sustainability at their core. Central to the design was the specification of 34 Marlon Clickfix RL rooflights glazed in clear Marlon Clickfix 1040 polycarbonate to ensure the offices and shops below were bright, appealing and flooded with natural light.

Commenting on the specification, Steve Higgins of Brett Martin said “One of the challenges for the architect was finding a thermally-efficient rooflight solution which would work at a low 7° pitch. Marlon Clickfix RL provided the the most adaptable solution and ensured a fast and straightforward installation for roofing and cladding contractor, Lakesmere.”

A lightweight polycarbonate panel, Marlon Clickfix 1040 has integral interlocking connections that simply click into place forming glazed areas of unlimited size and shape. The 40mm structured polycarbonate glazing panel has 10 insulating walls to achieve a U-value of 0.99 W/m²K, for a high performing and thermally-efficient glazing solution. It has a choice of thermally broken aluminium glazing bar systems depending on the application. The Marlon Clickfix RL glazing bar system – used at Here East – has been designed for use in low pitch rooflights and canopies, whilst Marlon Clickfix VF has been specifically developed for vertical installations such as façades, partitioning, rain screens and northlights.

Marlon Clickfix 1040 provides high quality natural light, superior thermal insulation and UV protection. In addition to the impact resistance, resilience and structural strength that is inherent in all of Brett Martin’s high performance polycarbonate sheet products, it is also lightweight and easy to handle.

With this state-of-the-art digital tech quarter now complete, Brett Martin Daylight Systems will demonstrate once again that introducing natural light into spaces is central to achieving the required performance of highly sustainable buildings.

For more information please visit www.brettmartin.com.

Good lighting is always essential but sometimes a well-lit interior also needs to be discreet when viewed from outside. This is the case with the very long Pier 1 which runs alongside the baggage system and gates at Gatwick Airport’s South Terminal Building. The two stringent requirements of privacy and security have been neatly solved using Kalwall®, with the added benefit of enhancing the long walkway by creating a pleasant interior ambience.

Kalwall offers complete line-of-sight protection, maintaining privacy for building occupants while bathing the interior with diffused daylighting regardless of the weather. It can also be manufactured for blast resistant applications such as in airports and other sensitive public environments, or to protect workers in areas at risk from explosions, such as in refineries or industrial complexes. Kalwall is also key to overcoming security concerns. Apart from providing visual protection, its inherent strength makes it ideal for secure locations. With heavy duty impact resistance properties, access through wall or rooflights can be denied while fire and most chemicals will not affect its surface.

Aesthetically, Kalwall will eliminate shadows and glare and the stark contrasts of light and shade. The system also enhances simplicity by doing away with the need for blinds, curtains or solar control. Even on cloudy days, the interior is flooded with natural daylight, which means less artificial lighting and, because Kalwall is highly insulating, energy costs are reduced. The standard Kalwall 70mm thick panel offers insulation up to 0.28W/m2K – equivalent to a cavity filled solid wall.

Apart from being specified for all types of new build project, Kalwall is increasingly used for the refurbishment of cladding or rooflights on aged buildings.

Case studies and technical information are available from Structura UK Ltd, Tel: 01233 501 504 or visit www.structura-uk.com/kalwall.

New research by scientists from the University of Bristol has revealed that domestic LED lights are much less attractive to nuisance insects such as biting midges than traditional filament lamps.

The team now highlights the urgent need for further research on other heat-seeking flies that transmit disease, including mosquitoes that are carriers of pathogens that cause damaging diseases such as malaria and Zika fever.

The study, funded by the Natural Environment Research Council and UK lighting manufacturer Integral LED, used customised traps at 18 field test sites across south-west England, illuminated by a series of LED, filament and fluorescent light sources. Over 4,000 insects were carefully identified.

The results showed that LEDs attracted four times fewer insects compared with the traditional incandescent lamps, and half as many as were attracted to a compact fluorescent lamp.

Notably, for biting flies (midges in the genus Culicoides, some species of which are vectors of wildlife disease), 80 percent were attracted to the filament lamp, 15 percent to the compact fluorescent and only 2-3 percent to each of the two different LED lamps.

Dr Andy Wakefield led the field research in a project supervised by Professors Gareth Jones and Stephen Harris from the University’s School of Biological Sciences.

Dr Wakefield said “we were surprised by the number of biting flies drawn to the traditional tungsten lights. We do not know why this is but we know that some insects use thermal cues to find warm-blooded hosts in the night, so perhaps they were attracted to the heat given off by the filament bulb.”

Co-sponsors of the study, Integral LED were instrumental in the commissioning of the project and provided technical and financial support.

The UK company’s Marketing Director Sanjiv Kotecha said “As lighting manufacturers, we welcome that a link between LED lights and low attraction to insects has been proven. The energy saving advantages of solid-state lighting are well known, yet the benefits to well-being are only beginning to be revealed.”

Watch the video below:

By Stephen Hurrell, Managing Director, Aurora Group UK Projects

There are several misconceptions about LED lighting, principally that LED lighting prices will go down so it pays to wait; LEDs are so efficient that controls are unnecessary; and that LEDs don’t work well in high-temperature environments.

According to the Energy Savings Trust, LED offers best value for money in lighting today; the price of fittings has come down and, at the same time, performance has improved significantly.

The Carbon Trust advocates LED as its number one efficiency recommendation. LeaUnknown-2ding website www.environmentalleader.com reports that while switching to LEDs creates a one-time savings event – typically reducing lighting energy use by up to 50% – integrated sensing and controls can nearly double those energy savings, making controls essential for maximum savings and project economics.

And did you know that by using LED in construction, it significantly contributes to the BREEAM rating of a building as it typically halves energy consumption of traditional light sources. Miniaturisation has also led to a significant reduction in raw materials utilised in manufacture.

Artificial lighting in buildings is usually categorised in three ways. The ‘Ambient’ lighting function provides light to the space to an accepted level. ‘Accent’ lighting highlights certain features and/or attributes. ‘Task’ lighting illuminates specific working areas to aid visibility.

Lighting Performance

The four key criteria governing LED performance are thermal management, optical control, efficacy of light and reliability of power. So, what are the guiding principles of best practice in quality manufacturing?

Heat has a negative impact on any LED light source’s performance. The next generation in thermal management dissipates heat away from the LED chip, providing higher quality, brighter light for longer.  There’s also been continuous improvement in efficacies of LED chips so the higher the lumens per watt, the better.

Look for products warranted to L70 to a stated number of hours.  This means you can expect a light output of 70% of the lumen performance stated at that period of time e.g., a 1000 lumen LED luminaire will deliver at least 700 lumens after six years, based on burning 4000 hours per year.

An emerging trend in construction is to insulate the ceiling void by ‘blowing in’ loose fill insulation as an alternative to loose-laid products. Loose fill completely encloses the fitting which could affect LED performance in inferior downlights.

 Biodynamic lighting

Light controls our biological or body clock and this is known as the circadian rhythm. New to the market, biodynamic LED lighting allows people to control their environment according to need, mood and task, which can improve performance and motivation. Changing the colour temperature of the artificial lightsource (e.g. from extra warm to warm through to cool) can have a dramatic effect. Biodynamics is particularly suitable for dynamic interior projects, retail applications, and in healthcare and homes for the elderly.

 Regulatory compliance

Lighting design is a complex issue and part of a quality manufacturer’s role is to develop bespoke schemes which will comply with regulations. A revised version of the Building Regulations, Part L (2013), came into force in April 2014. BIM LEVEL 2 was introduced as a requirement for all government construction projects this April 2016.

Enlite’s LED value solution

The Aurora Group has responded to increased demand for LED by engineering the Enlite range of 250+ “Lighting Essentials”. Enlite offers Offsite’s varied modular business model the best in value, quality and performance to meet specifications and budgets.

Firm Enlite LED favourites in the MMC sector are the E8TM 8W integrated fire rated downlights with halogen like appearance, the ultra-slim E6060 TM 600mm2 flat panels for commercial applications, the UniPac TM and LinearPac TM IP65 linear anti-corrosives which replace traditional T8s and the vandal resistant Orbital TM IP66 bulkhead.

 

Call: +44 (0) 1727 83 66 11 or visit http://enlitelighting.com

Will you see the light?

Since the late 1950’s GRP has been a feature of many commercial, industrial and agricultural buildings across the UK, bringing the free resource of natural daylight into the workplace.
GRP is a strong thermoset material with good impact resistance and consists of, among other components, polyester resin which is reinforced by a glass strand mat.

The success of Filon rooflights resulted in several UK based manufacturers continuously producing GRP. Eventually, this involved the use of alternative plastic materials such as PVC. As a brittle material, this was at times subject to damage due to storms, foot traffic on the roof and UV degradation.

This didn’t stop the efforts of thermoplastic manufacturers to try to compete with ‘Filons’ and other GRP rooflights though and polycarbonate in-plane rooflights were born and have since steadily encroached on the GRP rooflight market. There are many positive attributes to polycarbonate such as it providing high levels of light transmission, being very strong and having a good fire rating. There are however, many aspects that should be considered in rooflight material choice for profiled roof applications and we shall discuss them now.

Thermal movement

A thermoplastic material such as polycarbonate has much greater thermal movement than GRP and over 5 times more than the surrounding steel sheets.

If no allowance has been made for this movement such as oversized fixing holes, it could create some problems particularly around the fasteners such as the sheet cracking and at the end laps with seals potentially failing. It is also possible for rooflights with an insulating box detail, such as those used in composite panel roofs, for the rooflight to expand but find resistance. The material will have no room to move as it will be constrained by the surrounding metal roof panels and so could belly out – bulge out of shape between the purlins.

Light Distribution

Another significant consideration is the type of illumination required in the building. GRP has high levels of light transmission and is also a naturally diffusing product. It will provide an even distribution of natural daylight across the area to create a balanced illumination reducing bright spots, shadows and hot spots.

Thermoplastics like polycarbonate, when used as in-plane rooflights however, tend to be clear or colour tinted. They are much less diffusing and allow more light to pass directly through the rooflight. This can create localised bright spots with solar glare and also hotspots due to the nature of direct sunlight.

The first images show two very similarly constructed equestrian centres but one is fitted with polycarbonate rooflights and the other with Filon GRP rooflights. The images clearly show a very different lighting pattern: the polycarbonate rooflights allow light to pass directly through so that their position is clearly replicated on the floor – even the purlins are casting shadows on the ground; the GRP rooflights in comparison provide a very even light distribution, so much so that there are not even any shadows visible around the horse and rider – the perfect conditions for easily spooked horses.

The second pair of photographs show a supermarket distribution centre, firstly with polycarbonate rooflights and secondly after the rooflights have been replaced with Filon GRP. Again, in the first picture, the position of the rooflights is clearly visible by the bright spots on the floor. The picture with new GRP rooflights has eliminated all of the bright spots and reduced localised internal temperatures without compromising lux levels – much more suitable conditions for storing some supermarket goods and foodstuffs.

The example projects highlight the importance of selecting the appropriate rooflight material. For your next industrial, commercial or agricultural building, please give careful consideration about the type of light distribution required. If an even spread of diffused light, without shafts of light, hotspots or dark corners is preferred, then GRP is likely to be the most appropriate choice.

Written by Mark Wilcox, Sales Director, Filon Products Ltd

Important legislative changes have impacted on the use of lighting control systems within the education sector. Contractors must now provide controls which deliver greater energy savings in line with increasingly stringent regulations around sustainability. Additionally, these must be designed to meet each institution’s precise operational requirements, making decision-making around lighting and controls more complex.

Meanwhile, lighting controls have become significantly more sophisticated in functionality and quality. This allows specifiers and installers to select the most appropriate products for each customer, with expectation from end users around lighting controls increasing considerably.

There is now greater emphasis within BREEAM on consultation to truly understand client needs. Similarly, the implementation of BIM requirements means specifiers, armed with this in-depth understanding, must select fully compliant products.

A valuable lesson

As in any sector, it makes sense to select a lighting controls partner with significant experience in educational projects. Where schools and educational facilities differ from commercial spaces or offices is that the primary objective is to create an environment optimal for learning.

Budgetary constraints in the education sector cover both initial cost of purchase and delivering ongoing reduction in energy usage.

For instance, occupancy-sensing controls ensure lighting is used only when required, creating a well-lit classroom suited to effective learning while minimising unnecessary energy consumption and cost.

The best of both worlds

Typically, there will be three or four banks of lighting in a classroom – one close to windows, with another at the front where the whiteboard is. A lighting control system adjusts lighting accordingly to account for varying levels of artificial and natural light.

Typically, this means the lights nearest to the windows will be dimmable, and on a sunny day may dim down to as low as 25% of full output. Further into the space, depending how far the daylight penetrates, other rows may dim down to, say, 75% – or even remain at 100% output.

With widespread use of interactive whiteboards and projectors, dimmer switches help focus students’ attention as these can be used to dim light elsewhere within the teaching space.

Many classrooms, particularly in secondary schools, are used by numerous teaching staff and support staff outside teaching hours. This means the control interface must be easy to use by individuals unfamiliar with that classroom and with varying degrees of technical competence.

Versatility

Classrooms are often also used for extra-curricular and community-based activities. To optimise energy use, it makes sense to implement flexible systems which can cater for this. The absence of such measures can lead to wasteful energy consumption and increased cost, as lights are left on when only a few classrooms, connecting corridors and stairways are in use.

Similarly, rooms in universities and colleges are occupied sporadically, highlighting the need for automated systems ensuring lights are kept on only when in use. Selecting the right occupancy detection can deliver significant savings. In a classroom, for instance, a single microwave detector may offer the same control as two or more PIR detectors, reducing capital costs and cabling requirements.

The same applies to corridors, where the directional qualities of occupancy detectors can provide maximum coverage with the minimum number of sensors.

Conclusion

Lighting controls are continually evolving to meet the precise needs of the education sector. Correctly chosen solutions can help create the optimal learning environment. Seeking advice from those with specialist knowledge and experience in these crucial areas can help ensure clients receive the best solution.

The new Vitesse Plus, a seven-channel lighting control system by CP Electronics, has been specially designed with BIM and EFA guidelines in mind, as well as a growing need to find a cost-effective solution which is easy to set up. Features such as graduated dimming and corridor hold are simple to set up and control, with photocell detectors making adjustments that take advantage of natural light levels.

To find out more visit www.cpelectronics.co.uk.

Venture Lighting Europe has launched its very first range of VLED Filament Lamps for the domestic and commercial markets.

As the trend for classic filament lamps in bars, restaurants, hotels and homes following an industrial or vintage theme returns, Venture has created a highly efficient, low-energy alternative to the classic lamp using the latest high performance LED technology. Designed to be a direct replacement for halogen or incandescent lamps, Venture’s new stylish VLED Filament Lamps are A+ rated and can help businesses and homeowners save up to 90% in energy and significantly reduce carbon emissions.

The new VLED Filament Lamps, Venture’s latest addition to its growing range of VLED lighting solutions, carries many great benefits besides the attractive aesthetics, and can be selected in a range of traditional or alternative styles and a choice of outputs to find the right lamp to suit any application.

The VLED Filament Lamp is available as a GLS, candle, golf ball, globe or squirrel bulb, all of which offer a 300° multi-directional beam angle for a wide distribution of light across the room. Unlike other, traditional lamps, the LED technology means that the lamps reach the correct level of lighting instantly to avoid lengthy lamp ‘warm up’ times.

Available in 4W or 6W, the low-output lamps significantly reduce the electricity consumption of the scheme, which allows users to save a considerable amount of money on operating costs, with a very fast payback period of about one year. The VLED lamps also offer a 15,000 hour average lamp life, which is up to 15 times longer than average halogen or incandescent lamps. The VLED lamps are dimmable as standard to help save more energy where possible.

Based on the standard screw or bayonet fixing, the full range can be easily installed without the need for a professional electrician to allow businesses or homeowners to simply upgrade their existing lighting to these stylish lamps to create a warm, vintage ambience. The lamps can also be used as a stylish, contemporary alternative to standard bulbs to enhance the attractive aesthetics of pendant fixtures or chandeliers.

Designed for stylish interiors that reflect an industrial, vintage or contemporary design, Venture’s VLED Filament Lamps have been created with a colour temperature of 2700K to emit a warm colour light as standard, reflecting the original design of classic filament lamps. In having these warm light levels, a soft and relaxed ambience is created which is an increasing trend in the hospitality sector. Although the lamps have a low colour temperature, they also offer a high efficacy rate of up to 100 lumens per circuit watt to ensure high quality light is produced.

Venture Lighting Europe has produced an extensive brochure covering the full range of VLED Filament Lamps, highlighting their key features, benefits and application options, as well as an explanatory Payback Calculator to help customers understand the monetary savings involved with the lamp replacement. This brochure can be downloaded from the company’s website, www.venturelightingeurope.com/downloads.

Further information on the VLED Filament Lamp range is available from Venture Lighting Europe on 01923 692600, by emailing: info@venturelighting.co.uk or by visiting the company’s website at www.venturelightingeurope.com.

Important legislative changes have impacted on the use of lighting control systems within the education sector. Contractors must now provide controls which deliver greater energy savings in line with increasingly stringent regulations around sustainability. Additionally, these must be designed to meet each institution’s precise operational requirements, making decision-making around lighting and controls more complex.

Meanwhile, lighting controls have become significantly more sophisticated in functionality and quality. This allows specifiers and installers to select the most appropriate products for each customer, with expectation from end users around lighting controls increasing considerably.

There is now greater emphasis within BREEAM on consultation to truly understand client needs. Similarly, the implementation of BIM requirements means specifiers, armed with this in-depth understanding, must select fully compliant products.

A valuable lesson

As in any sector, it makes sense to select a lighting controls partner with significant experience in educational projects. Where schools and educational facilities differ from commercial spaces or offices is that the primary objective is to create an environment optimal for learning.

Budgetary constraints in the education sector cover both initial cost of purchase and delivering ongoing reduction in energy usage.

For instance, occupancy-sensing controls ensure lighting is used only when required, creating a well-lit classroom suited to effective learning while minimising unnecessary energy consumption and cost.

The best of both worlds

Typically, there will be three or four banks of lighting in a classroom – one close to windows, with another at the front where the whiteboard is. A lighting control system adjusts lighting accordingly to account for varying levels of artificial and natural light.

Typically, this means the lights nearest to the windows will be dimmable, and on a sunny day may dim down to as low as 25% of full output. Further into the space, depending how far the daylight penetrates, other rows may dim down to, say, 75% – or even remain at 100% output.

With widespread use of interactive whiteboards and projectors, dimmer switches help focus students’ attention as these can be used to dim light elsewhere within the teaching space.

Many classrooms, particularly in secondary schools, are used by numerous teaching staff and support staff outside teaching hours. This means the control interface must be easy to use by individuals unfamiliar with that classroom and with varying degrees of technical competence.

Versatility

Classrooms are often also used for extra-curricular and community-based activities. To optimise energy use, it makes sense to implement flexible systems which can cater for this. The absence of such measures can lead to wasteful energy consumption and increased cost, as lights are left on when only a few classrooms, connecting corridors and stairways are in use.

Similarly, rooms in universities and colleges are occupied sporadically, highlighting the need for automated systems ensuring lights are kept on only when in use. Selecting the right occupancy detection can deliver significant savings. In a classroom, for instance, a single microwave detector may offer the same control as two or more PIR detectors, reducing capital costs and cabling requirements.

The same applies to corridors, where the directional qualities of occupancy detectors can provide maximum coverage with the minimum number of sensors.

Conclusion

Lighting controls are continually evolving to meet the precise needs of the education sector. Correctly chosen solutions can help create the optimal learning environment. Seeking advice from those with specialist knowledge and experience in these crucial areas can help ensure clients receive the best solution.

The new Vitesse Plus, a seven-channel lighting control system by CP Electronics, has been specially designed with BIM and EFA guidelines in mind, as well as a growing need to find a cost-effective solution which is easy to set up. Features such as graduated dimming and corridor hold are simple to set up and control, with photocell detectors making adjustments that take advantage of natural light levels.

To find out more visit www.cpelectronics.uk.com.